Every NFL Team’s Best WR Of All Time

There have been a lot of great wide receivers in the NFL. The position was an afterthought in the early days of the NFL but it has become an integral part of every NFL offense and the number of good receivers seems to grow with every year. Here are the best wide receiver for each NFL team.

Arizona Cardinals – Larry Fitzgerald
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He already owns the single season and career Cardinal record books. He ranks second among active players with 104 TDs and is one of just 10 players to eclipse the 100 TD mark among receivers. His ranks ninth in NFL history in yards and leads all current receivers by a long shot.

Atlanta Falcons – Julio Jones
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Roddy White might have the career receiving records for the Falcons, but at Jones’ current pace he will shatter them. Jones is a game-changer and arguably the best receiver in the game today. His 2015 campaign saw him grab 136 passes for 1871 yards, one of the best seasons by a receiver ever.

Baltimore Ravens – Derrick Mason
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Mason holds the Ravens record for most receiving yards, not bad considering he didn’t become a Raven until his age 31 season. He is one of the most underrated receivers of his era. His 103 catches is still a Ravens’ season record.

Buffalo Bills – Andre Reed
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Reed went to seven Pro Bowls with the Bills and was consistently their best receiver during their dominant stretch in the early 1990s. The Hall of Famer owns the Bills’ career record books.

Carolina Panthers – Steve Smith
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Smith led the NFL in receptions, yards and touchdowns in 2005 with a 103, 1563, 12 TD campaign. He was the lifeblood of the Panthers’ offense in the 2000s and should find himself in Canton when it is all said and done. He currently sits seventh all time in receiving yards.

Chicago Bears – Harlon Hill
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Hill led the NFL in receiving touchdowns twice, was named NFL MVP in 1955, and Rookie of the Year in 1954. He was big and fast and played in an era where passing was not a major element of the game. He still ranks second in receiving TDs in Bears history and ranks second in yards. He averaged a very healthy 20.4 yards per reception in his career, which was hampered by major injuries and forced him out of the game at 30.

Cincinnati Bengals – A.J. Green
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The Bengals’ all-time records might be in the hands of Chad Johnson, but Green will soon zoom past those numbers. He already has over 7,000 career yards and is a little over 3,000 yards away from Johnson’s career yardage mark despite Johnson playing in almost twice as many games with the Bengals. Green is a threat to score any time he touches the ball and is the focal point of the Bengals’ offense.

Cleveland Browns – Paul Warfield
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Warfield averaged over 19 yards per catch and led the NFL in receiving TDs once while with the Browns. He eclipsed 1,000 yards only once in his six seasons with the Browns, but he was a dynamic player who was a threat to score any time he had the football. Sadly, he played in an era where the passing game was more of a necessity than part of the game plan.

Dallas Cowboys – Michael Irvin
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Irvin owns the top three season performances by a Cowboys’ receiver. His receiving records have all be tied or surpassed by Jason Witten but still rank at the top of wide receivers. He was the focal point of the passing attack of the 1990s Championship teams, even if the passing attack played second fiddle to Emmitt Smith and the run game. His 111-catch campaign in 1995 is still a Cowboys record.

Denver Broncos – Rod Smith
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Smith surpassed 1,000 yards in 8 of his 12 seasons with the Broncos and led the NFL with 113 catches in 2001, a Broncos single-season record. He was John Elway’s favorite receiver during his Super Bowl runs in the late 1990s. He might not have a lot of flashy seasons, but he was great for a decade.

Detroit Lions – Calvin Johnson
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Johnson was the best receiver in the NFL for a few years. His 1,964 yards is an NFL record. He surpassed 1,000 yards in seven of the nine seasons he played, and he led the NFL in receptions once, yardage twice and touchdowns once. He abruptly hung up his cleats after his age-30 season, leaving many to wonder what could have been.

Green Bay Packers – James Lofton
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Lofton’s greatness is often overlooked these days, but he was an outstanding receiver for a very long time. As a Packer, he had five 1,000-yard seasons in his nine years there. He led the NFL twice in yards per reception. He played on some bad Packer teams but still managed to put together the bulk of his Hall of Fame career.

Houston Texans – Andre Johnson
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Johnson led the NFL in receptions and yardage twice. He surpassed 100 receptions five times and 1,000 yards seven times. He was the best receiver in the NFL for a few years and made any quarterback throwing him the ball look good.

Indianapolis Colts – Marvin Harrison
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Harrison led the NFL in receiving yards twice, receptions twice, including an NFL record 143 in 2002, and touchdowns once. He had four straight seasons of 100 or more catches and eight straight years of 1,000 yards or more.

Jacksonville Jaguars – Jimmy Smith
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Smith’s career got off to a rocky start, but he found a home in Jacksonville in his age 26 season. He would go on to post nine 1,000-yard campaigns including two 100-reception seasons. He led the NFL with 116 catches in 1999. He torched the 2000 Baltimore Ravens defense for 291 yards and 3 TDs on 15 catches.

Kansas City Chiefs – Otis Taylor
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Often overlooked as a receiver because of the era he played in, Taylor was outstanding at his position. He led the NFL in receiving yards in 1971 with 1,110, led in touchdowns in 1967 with 11 and led in yards per catch in 1966 with an average of 22.4. He only had 410 career catches but had two seasons with over 1,000 yards and managed 57 TDs. He sits behind only Tony Gonzalez in yards and touchdowns in Chiefs history.

Los Angeles Chargers – Lance Alworth
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Alworth led the NFL in receptions three times, yardage three times, and TDs three times. His career best 1,602 yards came on just 69 catches. He was revolutionary at his position, and his 9,584 yards and 81 touchdowns are still good enough to lead all Charger wide receivers.

Los Angeles Rams – Henry Ellard
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Most people would place Isaac Bruce or Torry Holt here. However, Ellard reigns supreme among Rams’ receivers. He put up stellar numbers in an era that wasn’t as pass happy as it is today, and often did it without much help on the other side of the field. Ellard led the NFL in yardage in 1988 with 1,414 yards and eclipsed 1,000 yards four times as a Ram. In 1988, the second leading receiver on the Rams was Pete Holohan the tight end with 59 catches for 640 yards. Ellard doubled his production. When he was on he couldn’t be stopped.

Miami Dolphins – Mark Clayton
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Clayton surpassed 1,000 yards five times in his career, led the NFL in receiving touchdowns twice, and was a reliable weapon for Dan Marino throughout his career. He wasn’t as flashy as Mark Duper, but he was reliable, and the tandem thrived with Marino and helped him set passing records. If you wanted to take Duper, who has better career numbers, that would be fine, but as a receiver Clayton was a bigger threat to score and was a slightly more reliable target.

Minnesota Vikings – Randy Moss
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Moss is the closest thing to Jerry Rice the NFL has produced. He led the NFL in TDs three times and eclipsed the 1,000-yard mark in each of his first six seasons as a Viking. Cris Carter was great and might own the Viking record books, but Moss dominated the football field, even with Carter on it at the same time.

New England Patriots – Stanley Morgan
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He only had three seasons with at least 1,000 yards, but he led the NFL in yards per catch three times and touchdowns once. He surpassed 50 catches only twice in his career, a testament to the lack of incorporation of the passing game back then rather than an indictment of Morgan’s skill. He was outstanding and played in an era that didn’t truly recognize the passing game the way teams do today. He is the Patriots’ leading receiver in yardage, and fans who saw him play will remember how good he was.

New Orleans Saints – Marques Colston
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Colston and Drew Brees set the tone for the Saints’ offenses for several years. He compiled six 1,000-yard campaigns and had four seasons with at least 80 catches. He could do a little of everything and had great hands. His 711 catches, 9,759 yards and 72 touchdowns are all team records.

New York Giants – Odell Beckham, Jr.
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His career might just be getting started, but Odell is setting NFL records as he goes. He already has three of the top four years for receptions among Giants’ receivers and three of the top five for yards. His 13 TDs in 2015 tied Homer Jones’ record which had stood since 1967. Odell is the best receiver the Giants have ever had, and the record books should bear that out soon.

New York Jets – Don Maynard
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Maynard still leads all Jets’ receivers with 11,732 yards and 88 touchdowns. He played a huge role in Joe Namath becoming the first quarterback to pass for more than 4,000 yards. That year, 1967, Maynard led the NFL in yards with 1,434 yards on 71 catches. He led the NFL in receiving touchdowns in 1965 with 14. He had five 1,000-yard campaigns all in an era where the pass was still a novel concept. His team records will stand for a long time.

Oakland Raiders – Tim Brown
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The Hall of Famer ranks sixth all time in receiving yards and ranks ninth in touchdowns with 100. He led the NFL in receptions once and eclipsed 1,000 yards nine straight years. He was one of the best of his generation but sadly wasn’t truly appreciated until he retired.

Philadelphia Eagles – Harold Carmichael
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Carmichael was to the 1970s Eagles what Terrell Owens was to the mid-2000s Eagles. He was an absolute threat. In 1973, Carmichael led the NFL in catches and yards with 67 and 1,116 respectively. He put together just three 1,000-yard campaigns, but that was because the Eagles ran the ball a lot in that era. Carmichael only had two years where he caught more than 60 balls. Had he been used more, the four-time Pro Bowler would certainly be more well known outside of Philadelphia.

Pittsburgh Steelers – Antonio Brown
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His 136 catches in 2015 rank second in NFL history. He has had at least 100 catches in each of the last four years, leading the NFL twice I that category. He also led the NFL with 1698 yards in 2014. He should pass Hines Ward to own the Steeler record books at his current pace.

San Francisco 49ers – Jerry Rice
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He is the greatest receiver to ever play the game, and it isn’t close. He owns the NFL record books. Led the NFL in TDs six times, yards six times and yards twice. His 22,895 yards might never be eclipsed, and there is a great chance his 197 career touchdowns isn’t touched either.

Seattle Seahawks – Steve Largent
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Largent led the NFL in yards twice and ended his career with 819 catches for 13,089 yards and 100 touchdowns. His eight years of 1,000 yards or more were practically unheard of in the NFL at the time he played.

Tampa Bay Buccaneers – Mike Evans
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Evans has only appeared in 46 games for the Buccaneers to date, but his 3,578 yards already rank seventh. Barring injury he should slide into the top five. His 27 touchdowns already rank fifth in team history, and he could lead in that category by the end of this season.

Tennessee Titans – Drew Hill
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The late wide receiver was a favorite of Warren Moon’s as evidenced by his 480 catches in 106 games. Hill’s stats might trail Ernest Givins, but it’s close and Givins played in 32 more games with the Oilers. Hill is without a doubt the best receiver to play for the Oilers or Titans.

Washington Redskins – Art Monk
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Monk was the first receiver to catch 900 passes, 888 of which came with the Redskins. The Hall of Famer led the NFL in catches in 1984 with 106, and he surpassed 1,000 yards five times. He was a vacuum with some of the surest hands to ever play the game.